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GUEST POST: Writing Short Stories by Orlando Ortega-Medina

image003 Name: ORLANDA ORTEGA-MEDINA

Author of: JERUSALEM ABLAZE (2017)

On the web: orlandoortegamedina.co.uk

On Twitter: OOrtegaMedina

To celebrate the launch of his excellent debut short story collection, Jerusalem Ablaze, I’m very pleased to welcome Orlando Ortega-Medina to Reader Dad to talk about writing short stories.

I don’t have one specific method of writing the first draft of a short story. For example, I was inspired to write “Torture By Roses” after reading Yukio Mishima’s short story “Swaddling Clothes” in his collection Death in Midsummer. In that particular case, my aim was to write my own imagined backstory for Mishima’s story, and I composed it in my head before I wrote down a single word. In the case of “Jerusalem Ablaze”, I woke up from a nightmare, grabbed the steno pad that sits on my nightstand, and started writing, half-asleep. Two hours later I had my first draft of the story.

Jacket ImageMy Quebec stories “The Shovelist” and “Tiger at Beaufort Point” were inspired by real-life events, so there was some pre-planning at the starting point to ensure the events were properly fictionalised. This involved drafting character sketches and plot outlines, which I used, in effect, to re-invent reality. And my Israel stories are excerpts from an early novel I was composing, so they didn’t start life as short stories at all.

“After The Storm” is the story I pre-planned the most, in that I fully sketched it out in outline from start to finish before attacking the prose. Interestingly, it’s also the story I revised the most, almost interminably. Each time I re-read it I found something to improve, all the way until the day I was meant to turn it over to the publisher. But it was worth it, and I’m very pleased with the way turned out.

Regardless of how my short stories start their lives, my process for completing them is the same for all of them: I set them aside for a few days, then come back and revise them until they are as perfect as they’re going to be. To achieve this I have to be brutal in my revision process and not be afraid to cut out anything that doesn’t work. That being said, one has to know when to stop revising!

As for having a word-count, I aim to write no less than 1000 words a day, 5 days a week, with a goal of producing 10,000 publishable words per month. One can’t very well call oneself a writer unless one actually writes. So: Write – Everyday – No excuses.

Jerusalem Ablaze – Stories of Love and Other Obsessions is out now from Cloud Lodge Books, priced £12.99.

 

Blog Tour Jerusalem Ablaze

GUEST POST: Inspiration for Devour by L.A. LARKIN

Devour LA Larkin - jacket image Name: L.A. LARKIN

Author of: DEVOUR (2017)

On the web: lalarkin.com

On Twitter: @lalarkinauthor

To celebrate the launch of L.A. Larkin’s latest novel, Devour, the first in a series featuring journalist Olivia Wolfe, I am very pleased to have the author at Reader Dad as part of the #DevourTheBook Blog Tour, to talk about her inspiration for the novel.

Thanks so much for having me on your blog!

Devour is the first book in the Olivia Wolfe thriller series. It is an unusual action and conspiracy thriller for two reasons: firstly, it has a female central character, and secondly, it is set in a part of the world where very few thrillers have been set – Antarctica.

More often than not, the lead character in this style of thriller is male. Think James Rollins, Lee Child, Matthew Reilly, Clive Cussler, and most assassin-thrillers such as those by David Baldacci and Tom Wood. In my character, Olivia Wolfe, I wanted to create a dynamic, intriguing and credible female protagonist, who could hold her own in dangerous situations. I also wanted this character to have a legitimate need to travel all over the world so that each book could offer a new and exhilarating location.

I have always been a huge fan of The Sunday Times’ investigative journalist, Marie Colvin, who strived to reveal the truth about what was happening in war zones. She was an incredibly brave woman who tragically died in the bombardment of Homs in Syria in 2012. It was her courage that inspired the creation of investigative journalist, Olivia Wolfe, in Devour, although everything else about Wolfe has come from my imagination.

I have been lucky enough to go to Antarctica and I was so mesmerised by its savage beauty and the ever-present threat that such a dangerous location provides, I knew it was the perfect setting for a chiller thriller.

Scientific developments often fuel my stories. I also follow news on expeditions to Antarctica. One particular mission was to become the premise of Devour. In 2012, a British team set up camp above sub-glacial Lake Ellsworth in a very remote part of Antarctica. Their mission was to drill down through three kilometres of ice in the hope they might discover life in an ancient lake cut off from the rest of the world for centuries. Sadly, the team did not manage to reach the buried lake and called off the expedition. But, the question remains: what if there is ancient life down there, and, what if it was catastrophic to bring it to the surface?

L.A. Larkin’s thriller, Devour, is published by Constable at the end of January 2017. Peter James, says Devour ‘delivers action and intrigue in spades,’ and Culturefly says, ‘If you are only going to read one novel in 2017, I suggest you make it Devour.’

Devour Blog Tour Banner Landscape

GUEST POST: On Locations by CONRAD WILLIAMS

Hell is Empty Name: CONRAD WILLIAMS

Author of: DUST AND DESIRE (2015)
                      SONATA OF THE DEAD (2016)
                      HELL IS EMPTY (2016)

On the web: conradwilliams.wordpress.com

On Twitter: @salavaria

When I teach creative writing at university (I’ve had a few gigs over the years at Manchester Metropolitan, Edge Hill and, in the new year, I’ll be at St John’s, York) I invariably include a class dealing with sense of place. In the strongest fiction, a location can possess as much impact as a character; can in fact almost become another character, real or especially imagined. Look at China Miéville’s Bas Lag novels, Tolkien’s Middle Earth, Cormac McCarthy’s destroyed America in The Road, Iain Banks’ Scottish island in The Wasp Factory, William Golding’s island in Lord of the Flies. These are all fictional landscapes that provide a colourful, fertile background to their characters’ travails. These places are the novels, arguably. They are so exquisitely rendered that you feel you know them, that you could inhabit them.

In the crime novels I’ve written for Titan Books I very much wanted to make Joel Sorrell’s London a hyper-real city filled with shadows and light, texture and danger. Threat has to come from the antagonists, but it can also come from the urban surroundings. The city can feel alien even to those who spend their lives within it and Joel, as a loner, an outsider, is acutely aware of this. This loose sequence of novels is a missing girl trilogy, but also a trilogy of dereliction. Of duty, certainly, but more so where architecture is concerned. Each of the books end in crippled buildings because I wanted to have that sense of ruin and menace, as well as something positive rising from the dust: a worthy life, a father, a daughter, hope, love.

What is now the Renaissance Hotel, a beautiful reimagining of the old Midland, serving St Pancras station, was for a long time a shattered shell used as railway offices after its closure in 1935. Tours were made of the building in the mid 2000s and I signed up for one, having decided the hotel – surrounded by piledrivers and cranes and diggers – would make a great scene for the climax of my novel. Inside it was dusty, rotting, thick with shadow and old forgotten rooms, some of which had been sub-divided and were windowless places of filing cabinets and filth. The stealthy pursuit of the Four Year Old in Dust and Desire that draws Joel to a window leading out on to the roof of the train station was all mapped out as our group was taken along peeling corridors and that magisterial double staircase that, at the time, looked like some forgotten corner of Dracula’s castle.

Thinking about it, many of the set pieces that occur in this dereliction trilogy are found in and around buildings on the cusp of transformation or are ghosts of glory days long gone: the broken Liverpool docks and the sleeping giant of a hotel in Dust and Desire, a tired old tower block earmarked for refurbishment and a once bustling factory gone to seed in Sonata of the Dead, a squalid prison destroyed by fire in Hell is Empty. I guess they suggest the fragile, transitory nature of relationships. Everything gets demolished in the end. Everything is subject to decay.

31621_Hell-is-empty-Blog-tour

GUEST POST: On Writing FINDING HER by Anneloes Timmerjie

Finding Her Name: Anneloes Timmerjie

Author of: FINDING HER (with Charles den Tex) (2016)

On the web: www.anneloestimmerije.nl

‘You simply HAVE to hear this story.’ That’s how it started. The words were spoken by a good friend and film producer. He told the story and we hung on his every word. That is the kind of story it is. He wanted to know if we would like to write the screenplay. Of course we wanted to, except that we wrote the book first. Finding funding for the film takes time and this story just had to be told –seventy years of gathering dust in the folds of history was long enough.

The life of our main characters – Guus and Lienke Hagers – is not all that different of the life of thousands of people in the Dutch East Indies and the Pacific during WWII. That is why it is so compelling. They were separated from each other and they did not know where the other was or even the other was still alive. In exactly the same way the first husband of Anneloes’ mother disappeared in one of the Japanese internment camps. He died of neglected dysentery, never knowing that his son was born, that he had become a father.

Without the efforts of documentary film maker André Eilander the story of Guus and Lienke would never have been found. Eilander delved into the history of the 18th Squadron, an almost forgotten bomber squadron in Australia, and found story after story after story. He found Guus’diaries and photo books and flight logs, and he found Lienke’s memoirs and indications for political machination that are still felt today. He handed all his beautifully rich research material to us without any conditions.

Almost everyone wants to know how it is done, writing a book together. We didn’t know, we had never done it before. We have known each other for 36 years, we have been writing for as many years, most things we do together, but writing a book together was one thing we still had to learn. We did have one major advantage: a large part of the story was already there. All we had to do was figure out how to write it, because you need more than a true story to make a good story.

It was funny, and sometimes pretty irritating, to find out how we are different from each other. Charles, a fast writer, would propose a ridiculously short deadline for the first version. Anneloes, a slower writer, would protest loudly and manage to negotiate and extra two weeks. Still, it was important to have that first version soon, because it would prove that we could actually do it, write together. Not just according to ourselves, but according to our editor.

The process of writing, plotting and additional research was exciting. The simple fact that we could talk to each other about what we were writing, was a wonderful surprise, because we never do that. When we are each working on our own book, we can talk about almost anything except the work itself. That disrupts our concentration and tends to throw you out of your own story. When you write together that limitation doesn’t exist.

We spent the first week talking. We sat down opposite each other and brainstormed, thinking out loud and listening to each other. After that week we had outlined about ten chapters and we had developed a dramatic line. Once we had that we divided the work in the most obvious and role reinforcing way: Charles tackled the male things and Anneloes got to work on the female things. Charles, a born Australian, wrote about Australia, and Anneloes, of Indonesian descent, wrote about the Dutch East Indies.

That is how the first version was written, we each wrote our separate parts, Charles integrated them into one document and then Anneloes was the first to read the entire story, she scratched what she didn’t like and added what she missed, corrected things that were wrong, and she worked on creating a new ‘voice’ for the two of us, one in which our different styles of writing could grow to a new, common style. When she was done, she handed it over the Charles who proceeded to do the same thing. The manuscript went back and forth between us more than six times: writing, rewriting, changing, scratching, discussing, adding, changing the plot and adding new research. And then discussing it all over again.

Finding Her is based mostly on historical facts. The main characters and almost all the other characters really did exist. They lived the war. But to turn history into a novel, we took the liberty to simplify certain events or to enlarge them, sometimes we moved characters sideways in time and space, we dramatized developments and skipped others, all the while keeping in mind that it might have happened that way if fate had been just a little different.

Sometimes later research showed that our fictionalizing had actually brought us closer to what had really happened. Those are the precious little gifts of writing. The most beautiful reward came on the day the book was presented in the Netherlands. In the audience was a 93 year widow, a woman we didn’t know and had never met, and she told us and everyone present that our story was also her story, quite literally, because her husband was Guus’ navigator and she was in the same internment camp as Lienke.

A little while later we met and 85 year old woman who was in a different camp during the war. She had seen Guus’ airplane fly over the camp. She had seen how he threw leaflets out of plane with the name ‘Lienke’ written on them, because he was trying to find out where she was. This woman had picked up one of the leaflets, went looking for Lienke and couldn’t find her. She kept the piece of paper, thinking that one day she would find out who this Lienke was. Seventy years later she picked up our book in the bookstore, read the flyleaf and knew that she had found her.

Finding Her by Charles den Tex and Anneloes Timmerjie is now available, published by World Editions and priced £12.99.

GUEST POST: The Problems With Time Travel by MARK MORRIS

Wraiths cover Name: Mark Morris

Author of: THE WOLVES OF LONDON (2014)
                 THE SOCIETY OF BLOOD (2015)
                 THE WRAITHS OF WAR (2016)

On the web: www.markmorrisfiction.com

On Twitter:  @MarkMorris10

Mark-Morris-Obsidian-Blog-Tour (1)I’ve been a big fan of Doctor Who ever since I was terrified by the Yeti, the Ice Warriors and the Cybermen when I was four, but although the Doctor is a time traveller, in the original series (1963-89) the show rarely tackled the machinations and complexities of time travel itself. However in one particular 1972 story, Day of the Daleks, the question was raised as to why a time traveller couldn’t simply go back and nip a potentially terrible situation in the bud before it developed – and furthermore, why, if they failed the first time, they couldn’t keep going back.

The obvious answer, in reality, is that such an ability would completely negate the drama and excitement of pretty much every story. The Doctor, however, came up with a catch-all phrase, a kind of cosmic or temporal rule, whereby continually revisiting the same timeline in order to change it was an impossibility presumably imposed by time itself. He called it the Blinovitch Limitation Effect.

When writing my OBSIDIAN HEART trilogy, I too had to consider not only this question, but countless others. The more I delved into the intricacies of time travel – its possibilities, its anomalistic qualities – the more I became convinced that time travel was, and always would be, impossible. For instance, if we were able to time travel, we would all be able to become multi-millionaires overnight by literally creating money out of nothing. How, you may ask. Well, consider this. Imagine if the present you was visited by a future version of you from (let’s say) ten years hence with a suitcase containing twenty million pounds. With that amount of money you could not only live comfortably off the interest, but you could also generate more money – a lot more money! – and then in ten years time all you would have to do would be to fill the suitcase you’d been given ten years earlier with twenty million pounds, and go back to give it again to your younger self – and on and on, ad infinitum.

Of course, if everyone did this it would lead to massive problems – economies crashing, money becoming worthless – but then that would change the future, which would mean that your future self couldn’t appear to you in the first place, thus creating an anomaly. But what if the item was smaller, less influential? What if your future self appeared, gave you a pen, and said, “Keep this for the next twenty years, and then on October 10 2036 travel back to October 10 2016 and give your past self this pen and the exact same instructions I’m giving you.” The question then, of course, would be, where did the pen come from? Where and how and when was it made? Because it only exists in the twenty year time loop as your possession, forever being passed back to your younger self. Which ultimately means it – like the money – was created out of nothing!

You can tie yourself in knots with this stuff – and I frequently did during the writing of OBSIDIAN HEART. Hopefully I managed to negotiate a safe route through the minefield, though as it’s such a complex subject there is always the possibility that I overlooked something. I guess only time will tell.

THE MILLION DOLLAR BLOG TOUR by Natasha Courtenay-Smith

THE MILLION DOLLAR BLOG THE MILLION DOLLAR BLOG

Natasha Courtenay-Smith (natashacourtenaysmith.com)

Piatkus (www.littlebrown.co.uk)

£13.99

This week sees the release of Natasha Courtenay-Smith’s The Million Dollar Blog, a book that looks at the current state of play in the blogging industry and offers advice on how to stand out from the crowd. To celebrate the launch of this essential read for anyone currently running, or planning to run, a blog of any description, I – along with a number of my fellow bloggers – have been asked to take part in a blog tour with a bit of a difference. Rather than reviewing the book, we have been asked to talk about our own blogging experiences and, perhaps, offer tips that have helped us on our journey. I would highly recommend checking out the rest of the tour: there are some excellent pieces which give some insight into the world of the jobbing blogger.

My own experience with blogging started in the dim and distant past when people used LiveJournal to blog about how many hours they slept last night, or what, exactly, they did yesterday in more detail than anyone needs to know. After a couple of aborted attempts, I decided that it wasn’t for me, so I left it. Years later, Twitter came along and I found myself having conversations not only with like-minded readers, but with the people who wrote and published the books I loved to read. And so the idea formed: a blog that would concentrate solely on book reviews with little insight into my personality beyond what I thought of the book in question. The name came to me as I was staring at the WordPress registration screen, months-old baby in one arm.

Long-time readers of the blog will know that the blog has evolved – as has my reviewing style! – over its five-and-a-half-year lifetime, to include guest posts, interviews, a book-related travelogue and – my crowning achievement so far, in my own humble opinion – the wonderful essays that make up Carrie at 40. Adaptation is the nature of the game, providing content that will interest your readers and bring them back for more time and time again.

There are countless book review blogs out there in the big bad world, and you don’t need to look too far to find them. So, why bother? Why does my opinion matter, and why do I think anyone else would be interested in hearing it? Reader Dad, like many of the book review blogs, is a labour of love; it was never intended to make me famous or rich. It is, quite simply, a venue that allows me to share my love of books with the world. In my five-and-a-half years I have built up a small but consistent core following (hello there!) and it is for these people that I write. I have long been of the opinion that book review blogs are more likely to sway readers one way or the other than newspaper or magazine reviews. Why? The complete history of my opinions on books is available at the reader’s fingertips. It gives people a sense of what kind of reader I am, and lets them decide whether my taste is similar enough to their own for them to trust my reviews.

And there, for me, is the crux of the matter: trust. I write honest reviews (and would recommend anyone running a book review blog to do the same) and while I often receive free books, they are always sent in the implicit understanding that I will always be 100% honest about what I thought of them. There is nothing that sets me apart from a hundred other bloggers except that some people have similar tastes to me and have come to trust the reviews I write. It’s a winning formula: I get to keep banging on about books in the knowledge that people read what I write, and I get people talking about books which, let’s face it, is much better than talking about anything else!

Don’t let the overcrowded blogosphere put you off starting your own: there will always be someone out there who trusts your opinion over anyone else’s and if you can keep the conversation going with that one person, then you’re doing something worthwhile.

The Million Dollar Blog by Natasha Courtenay-Smith is out now, priced 13.99.

BLOG TOUR

GUEST POST: The Arrival of Opportunity by ALIYA WHITELEY

Name: ALIYA WHITELEY

Author of: THE BEAUTY (2014)
                 THE ARRIVAL OF MISSIVES (2016)

On the web: aliyawhiteley.wordpress.com

On Twitter: @AliyaWhiteley

Aliya Whiteley’s second novella, The Arrival of Missives, goes on sale on Monday 9th May. To celebrate the book’s launch Reader Dad is very pleased to welcome Aliya back to talk about the book’s origins.

There are lots of brave young women out there in literature but I never wanted to write one myself.

I’ve certainly loved many of them. I reread Jane Eyre many times and winced at Emma Woodhouse’s mistakes. I recognised the yearnings of Ursula Brangwen and held my breath for the nameless bride in Rebecca. Modern books have given me female leading characters who are perhaps more action driven (which you could say is a trend in popular entertainment generally) in the form of Halo Jones, Lisbeth Salander, and Lyra Belacqua. But the more these characters found themselves in incredible and dangerous situations, the less able I felt to create one myself. I wouldn’t be writing from a position of empathy. I didn’t feel I would make the same choices if I ever got thrust into such interesting perils. As a teenager I was bookish and quiet (well, I still am). I wished for excitement and did nothing about finding it in any place other than within the pages of the stories I loved. And I certainly didn’t want to create a heroine like myself – what would be the fun in reading about that?

But then The Arrival of Missives popped into my head, and I started to write a story that, as a writer, terrified me. I didn’t have the emotional distance from my lead character that I thought I needed to make it work. My own experience of being a young woman, dreaming of a future I was also scared of, kept getting in the way.

Somerset in 1920. Shirley Fearn is a bright young woman who has opinions about the immorality of war and the importance of love. She feels passionately about education as the tool that can guide young men towards making a better world. She also feels passionately about her mysterious schoolmaster, Mr Tiller. She has plans for her future. For everyone’s future.

When I first started to get into her voice I thought of her as the opposite of me. I soon realised that she was utterly recognisable: not in deeds, but inside her head. I was giving her thoughts and feelings that I had experienced as a teenager. I might have been quiet, but I had lots of opinions. It’s not a question of what both Shirley and I were thinking, but when and where the opportunity arose to express those thoughts.

Writing Shirley made me realise that character and opportunity are not automatically the same thing. Often the situation of the book controls characterisation, feeding into the idea that we learn from our experiences and become the sum of them. This is the act of making meaning from our lives. So Ursula Brangwen (a huge influence on The Arrival of Missives) becomes a teacher and finds the experience changes her. She recognises the intense, seething battle taking place between the young and the old for power, and therefore must decide on what side of that battle she lies. DH Lawrence was a master of this organic growth from event to action to internalisation, I think, and the struggle this creates in us all.

How Ursula views that relationship between age and youth is, though, entirely a creation of her mind. She has such strength of will, and it paints the world around her. That’s what helped me to write Shirley. Very strange things happen to her (events that we might characterise as science fiction or even horror in terms of literary genre) and yet she sees them all as a reinforcement of her world view. I found that I loved writing Shirley’s forceful decision to interpret all the things that happen to her, and her small village, as steps towards the future she wanted.

When I reached the end of Shirley’s story she had changed; what’s the point of writing if people, characters or otherwise, aren’t changed by it? But I’m still not sure if the change within her breaks my heart or reassures me. I suppose we all have to alter to grow. We can’t stay the same, and character can’t be an excuse for stagnation on the page or in real life.

Having said that, I’m still quiet and bookish. But it doesn’t worry me so much any more. It turns out that being afraid of whether life will ever give you an opportunity – whether the unique things inside of you that makes up your character will be wasted – is a big part of being young. Writing Shirley Fearn reminded me of that, and also proved to me that the thoughts are equally as important as the actions. It’s how the two relate to each other that decides the future, whatever it may be.

missives tour

INFLUENCES: My Writing Influences by CHRIS WHITAKER

Whitaker, Chris Name: CHRIS WHITAKER

Author of: TALL OAKS (2016)

On Twitter: @whittyauthor

Tall OaksTo celebrate the launch of Chris Whitaker’s excellent debut novel, Tall Oaks, I’m very pleased to invite him to Reader Dad to talk about his writing influences. Be sure to check the other stops on the blog tour for more great insights into author and novel, and check back here soon for my own thoughts on the book.

When I was a child my favourite books were the Topsy and Tim series by Jean and Gareth Adamson. I had (and still have) about fifteen of them and I remember reading them so often that I’d memorised each and every story. I read them to my children now and it’s funny to see how dated they are. In Topsy and Tim Move House the removal men smoke pipes whilst lifting the sofas! I used to write my own Topsy and Tim books. I wish I still had them but my mum threw them away (sentimental old cow).

Tall Oaks Blog BannerFrom Topsy and Tim I moved on to The Famous Five by Enid Blyton. I hated The Famous Five, though my all-knowing parents decided I should love them as much as they did. My brother passed down the entire set to me. Apparently there were only due to be six originally published, but due to their success, and Blyton’s love of money, I had to suffer through twenty one of the things before I was suitably drowned in the wonders of cottages, islands, and the English and Welsh countryside. Looking back now I think I took such a dislike to them because they felt old fashioned even back then, boys don’t want to read about the joys of ‘picnicking’ even as a prelude to a treasure hunt. I yearned for escapism, and still do with the books I like to read now. That’s partly why I invented the town of Tall Oaks and set it 5,000 miles away from home.

I discovered the Point Horror books after getting caught, and banned from, reading Carrie by Stephen King when I was twelve. I think they were aimed at teenage girls (also an interest of mine at that time). I loved the Point Horror books, Trick or Treat by Richie Tankersly Cusick  was my favourite. It was so well written and creepy, definitely an inspiration for the opening chapter of Tall Oaks where Jess sees a clown in her son’s bedroom.

So on to my influences as an adult reader. There really are too many to list but I’ll have a go. Dennis Lehane is one of my all time favourite writers. From Mystic River to Live By Night, I love the detail in the setting for each of his novels. In Mystic River the streets of The Flats, and the neighbourhoods of East Buckingham and The Point almost become their own characters, which was definitely something I aimed for in Tall Oaks. I’m also a huge fan of Kazuo Ishigaro. Never Let Me Go is one of my favourites and I really love the sense of unease he creates throughout the book, and the characterisation is second to none. Cormac McCarthy, John Grisham, Graham Greene, Harper Lee, all masters of their craft and all have influenced me in the biggest way possible, by inspiring me to want to write.

Tall Oaks by Chris Whitaker is published by Twenty7 and is now available in ebook, priced £4.99. A paperback release is scheduled for September.

Exclusive Excerpt from Sven Hassel’s WHEELS OF TERROR

image005 WHEELS OF TERROR: A Graphic Novel Adaptation

Sven Hassel (www.svenhassel.net)

Jordy Diago (jordy-diago.blogspot.co.uk)

Weidenfeld & Nicholson (www.wnblog.co.uk)

£16.99

This week sees the UK publication of the graphic novel adaptation of Sven Hassel’s 1959 novel, Wheels of Terror. Adapted by Hassel’s family, and brought to life by the stunning artwork of Spanish artist Jordy Diago, the book is published to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.

To celebrate the book’s release, the publisher have very kindly made the complete Chapter 9 available to Reader Dad for everyone to enjoy. Click on the image below to download the PDF file and enjoy this beautiful, if gory, glimpse at life on the Front.

chapter9

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